Cefdinir in pregnancy and breastfeeding

Cefdinir]]>

Risk Factor: BM
Class: Anti-infectives/ Cephalosporins

Contents of this page:
Fetal Risk Summary
Breast Feeding Summary
References

Fetal Risk Summary

Cefdinir is an oral, semisynthetic, third generation cephalosporin antibiotic. The molecular weight (about 395) is low enough that passage to the fetus should be expected.

Reproduction studies have been conducted in pregnant rats and rabbits (1). In pregnant rats, oral doses up to 11 times the human dose based on body surface area (HD) were not teratogenic, but decreased fetal weight occurred at doses 1.1 times the HD. No effects on maternal reproductive performance or offspring survival, behavior, development, or reproductive function. In rabbits, oral doses up to 0.23 times the HD were not teratogenic, but maternal toxicity (decreased body weight) was noted at the highest dose. No adverse effects on offspring were observed (1).

Although no published reports on the use of cefdinir during human pregnancy have been located, cephalosporin antibiotics are usually considered safe to use during gestation.

Breast Feeding Summary

No published reports describing the use of cefdinir in human lactation have been located. The molecular weight (about 395) is low enough that excretion into breast milk should be expected. However, the drug was not detected in breast milk after a single, 600-mg oral dose (1). Multiple dosing during lactation has apparently not been studied. If excretion does occur, three potential problems exist for the nursing infant: modification of bowel flora, direct effects on the infant, and interference with the interpretation of culture results if a fever workup is required. The American Academy of Pediatrics considers other cephalosporins to be compatible with breast feeding (2).

References

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  1. Product information. Omnicef. Abbott Laboratories, 2001.
  2. Committee on Drugs, American Academy of Pediatrics. The transfer of drugs and other chemicals into human milk. Pediatrics 1994;93:13750.

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